Debra Scacco: Origins

Works by Debra Scacco explore the notion of place. Her LA River works explore the unique history of the river, and the role it has played in shaping modern-day Los Angeles. Each work in the Origins series holds a line drawing of a previous river course at its core. With each line emanating out from the last, the hand-engraved mirrored face of the works traces the radical difference in current a single line will make. The concrete body of the work echoes the physical structure of the channelized river itself. The two pieces on display at LASHP depict river maps from 1815 and 1825.

Debra Scacco received a BA in Studio Art from Richmond University, London, in 1998. She has exhibited extensively both in America and internationally, including solo exhibitions with Klowden Mann and Marine Contemporary in Los Angeles, and group exhibitions at Charlie James Gallery (Los Angeles), Patrick Heide Contemporary Art (London), and Royal Academy of Arts (London). Scacco’s work has been written about and featured in the Los Angeles Times, New American Paintings, and Art in America. In 2012 she was the first Artist-in-Residence at the Statue of Liberty National Monument and Ellis Island Museum. After residing in London for 16 years, Scacco relocated to Los Angeles in 2012. She is represented by Klowden Mann (Los Angeles).

Lauren Bon and the Metabolic Studio

Bending the River Back Into the City

2012–present

Downtown Los Angeles

Bending the River Back into the City is a sculptural artwork that utilizes Los Angeles’ first water commons and allows the currency of water to create social capital. This long-term project will clean LA River water to potable standards, and the water will become part of a distribution network that will deliver water to individuals, organizations, and institutions. This phased project will begin to manifest in 2018 with the creation of an inflatable dam that will sit in the LA River—bending and driving a percentage of the river water through a diversion canal, and into a treatment facility. Bending the River Back into the City will eventually provide a waterwheel named LA Noria that reanimates the legacy of the waterwheels that drove water on and around the site in the 19th century.

The Liminal Camera:

In 2010, Lauren Bon, and artists Richard Nielsen and Tristan Duke formed the Optics Division of the Metabolic Studio, which is devoted to reinventing photography in a post-industrial era. The Liminal Camera is a giant functioning camera made from a 20-foot shipping container, which can be seen in the courtyard of MASS MoCA from October 22nd through to November 27th. The team has traveled the country making photographs with the Liminal for the past six years. Transported by flatbed truck, barge or train, the Liminal is both a camera and a darkroom in which the Optics Division captures and develops monumental format negatives. The word “liminal” refers to a threshold and an in-between spacea fitting name for a camera where people are invited to come inside, and experience where image and place meet.

 

About Lauren Bon and the Metabolic Studio

Derived from the Greek word for change, “metabolism” is the process that maintains life. In continuous cycles of creation and destruction, metabolism transforms nutrients into energy and matter. Lauren Bon’s studio practice includes a team of individuals that work together across a range of investigative platforms, transforming resources into energy, actions and outcomes.

Ms. Bon is trained as an architect and is a practicing visual artist. Her Metabolic Studio creates “devices of wonder” that are specific to sites; investigating land and water use and positing new modalities in thinking and behavior. The Inter-Mountain West, stretching from the Rockies to the Sierra Nevada is a terrain formed by the forces of water and fire over glacial time. It is our shared watershed that is the focus of the geographic scope of the Metabolic Studio’s work.

The Optics Division of the Metabolic Studio returns photography to its simplest technology, building its own tools and sourcing its own chemistry and even mining silver to produce emulsion. The Optics Division’s handmade processing and silver mining allude to the independent maker of images and the alchemy of silver and water and dust.

Grand Opening, April 22, 2017

Los Angeles we are finally ready for you!

Please join us for the long-awaited Grand Opening of Los Angeles State Historic Park.

We are planning a day-long celebration of music, performance, family-friendly activities and food trucks.

The park is easily accessible by the Chinatown Gold Line Station or by bicycle.  Limited parking in the park.

Music Performers to be announced shortly.

 

More details to follow as the date approaches.  Please help us spread the word!

Earth Day!

Earth Day is just around the corner and we are gearing up for our huge two day celebration. We will be joined this year by The William C. Velasquez Institute for a campfire program and camp-out in the park. To register for the event click on the link and join us for an urban outdoor experience.

Earth Day!

Your Weekly Polaroid

"The Lone Lupine"

Wetlands, Birds and Rivers of Los Angeles

While anxiously awaiting the return of our seasonal wetland at LASHP, this morning we took a trip over to Rio de Los Angeles State Park to check out how our little sister park was handling the wet weather. Turns out she is faring quite nicely, with an amazing wetland of her own taking shape. The “oxbow” area of Rio de Los Angeles was actually designed to become a wetland, or riparian habitat, with water provided through a combination of seasonal rains and irrigation run-off from the active recreational areas in the park. The plants and trees are native species – willows, sycamores, toyon, bullrushes, sage – to name just a few. Rio de Los Angeles, like LASHP, is a former railyard (Taylor Yard) and was once highly industrialized and covered in tracks. Hard to believe!

Checking out the Rio wetland
Checking out the Rio wetland
Rio wetland
Rio wetland

We also went a bit further up the road to an undeveloped portion of Rio de Los Angeles which overlooks the Glendale Narrows. The river was flowing more rapidly than normal due to the rainfall, but the birds, as always were abundant in this natural, soft-bottomed section of the Los Angeles River. Someday we hope to connect LASHP to the river and see these same species up close and personal, right here next to the Broadway Bridge.

Black Phoebe and Snowy Egret
Black Phoebe and Snowy Egret
Snowy Egret
Snowy Egret
Black-necked Stilts
Black-necked Stilts
Glendale Narrows
Glendale Narrows

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